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Diabetes Support Forum UK  /  General Discussion  /  Fungal Toenails - Laser Treatment
Posted by: AndyK, February 21, 2011, 2:20pm
:-/Hi,

First time poster! I will introduce myself when I have five minutes. My problem is that I picked up a fungal toenail infection when I was in hospital with a broken leg a couple of years ago. I have benn using CuraNail virtually continuously but just cannot get rid of the problem. Every time it looks like I am making progress it seem to flare up again - mainly on the big toe nails. I have tried alternative treatments such as cyder vigegar and tee-tree oil but with these it slowly worsens. My GP will not give me the tablets which some people are perscribed. I suspect it is cost although I although he mentions liver function. My last function test was AOK! Last time I saw him he said it would be better if my HbA1C was lower - I tend not to believe this as a non-diabetic colleague has a far, far worse problem. I have seen laser treatment for fungal nails advertised. Has anybody any experience of this?

Thanks,

Andy
Posted by: sedge, February 21, 2011, 3:13pm; Reply: 1
Hiya Andy

There are lots of other creams and things available on scrip, liquid you can paint on for starters.  I know nothing about tablets, not heard of anyone having them.  

Of course having a higher than it should be A1c won't help at all - it's usually genital thrush that people get because of higher than normal BG but it's more or less the same fungus as 'foot rot' LOL

It could be that you are right about the cash, maybe your GP feels it's a waste of resources to attack the infection with expensive drugs as it will just come back - which it will of course - because 'sugary' blood is the ideal breeding ground for this little nasty.  So you need a two pronged attack - and maybe we can suggest things to help you achieve better control?  I'd like to think we can!

Now please go and post the whole picture about yourself and stop trying to treat this problem piecemeal !  It's amazing how quickly infections that have been hanging round forever disappear as soon as you do control your BG !

(An awful lot of us have been there done that so I ain't preaching - just telling it like it is)
Posted by: GrammaBear, February 21, 2011, 3:28pm; Reply: 2
Andy -

I live in the US so things are probably done differently than in the UK.  My husband, who is not diabetic, took the tablets you've mentioned for 3 months.  Your Doctor was not exaggerating when he mentioned possible liver damage.  My husband was required to have lab work every 3 weeks during that entire 3 month period just to check for liver damage.  He was very fortunate in that he suffered no liver damage and after about 6 months the toenail fungus went away.  However it was almost a year before the nails began to resemble 'normal toenails'.  He had the fungus problem for a very long time before treatment.

This forum can help you with many suggestions, you first need to explain a little about yourself.  Welcome to you :)
Posted by: Avocado, February 21, 2011, 4:07pm; Reply: 3
Hi Andy,

My husband has this toenail fungal infection, his nails are yellow and black and thickened and horrible. He uses some stuff he applies once or twice a week, he's been using it for four years now and it's really not much better. He also sees a chiropodist which helps somewhat and who advises him on the stuff he applies. The only alternative is the tablets (Lamisil ?) which my husband doesn't want to take because of the very real risk of liver damage and other side effects. He's now saying that he's just going to live with the fungal infection.

I am encouraging him to ask to see a dermatologist. A couple of years ago we met socially a scientist who was working with a pharmaceutical company who had developed a new tablet which doesn't cause liver damage, but it was very new and maybe it isn't on the market yet - but I think if my husband sees a dermatologist there's more chance he would get something like that prescribed rather than the Lamisil as I know my husband won't take that and he's fed up applying ointment that isn't really effective and costs a fortune.
Posted by: Joanne G, February 21, 2011, 4:27pm; Reply: 4
Another one here with a hubby with fungal toe nails! Since he was diagnosed last month with diabetes, and I have been reading up, it occurred to me that the reason the fungus has become far worse in the last two or three years could be due to his blood sugar levels. Will have to ask at our next meeting with the nurse which is tomorrow.


Quoted Text
Last time I saw him he said it would be better if my HbA1C was lower - I tend not to believe this as a non-diabetic colleague has a far, far worse problem.


I strongly urge you to take your doctor's advice about your own blood sugar level. 18 months ago, dh's doctor gave him the news that his reading was slightly high, but dh didn't come away with the impression that it was serious, just at the top end of normal. Now he has T2 diabetes. Looking at his three readings for the last three years or so, there is an upward trend, although we had no appreciation of what it really meant at the time. If we had known a couple of years ago what we know now, we could very likely have prevented his diabetes.
Posted by: sedge, February 21, 2011, 4:47pm; Reply: 5
Joanne, I do admire your sentiments and the intention of your post but ......

if you have to be on any kind of dietary regime for the rest of your life in order to control a condition - then you haven't prevented it, you already have it to some degree! - you are treating the condition aren't you? -  by eg not eating many carbs and doing some exercise.  Not everybody who (exaggeration but you know what I mean) eats cake all day and is a couch potato gets diabetes, do they?  OK you might have prevented the glucose content of the blood getting any worse, or prevented hubby having to take medication either forever or for longer - but prevent the actual condition? - Not!!  - the best you'd have done is he would have a lifelong glucose intolerance LOL
Posted by: Avocado, February 21, 2011, 4:54pm; Reply: 6
Oh, I should say, my husband with the black and yellow thickened awful fungal toe nails for over four years is not diabetic....so his fungus is nothing to do with blood glucose.

Posted by: Liam, February 21, 2011, 5:16pm; Reply: 7
My dad had this for years.   He also used the paint on treatments, which work for a bit but then it comes back. After years of it he went to the GP and explained this, they prescribed him the pills which go into the nail as it grows. He put in a repeat for it, and was shocked they said no. It was only then he was told how toxic the pills are and that he'd had enough. He says the 1st doctor told him that he should take them until the nail was totally renewed, but I think he might have misunderstood. So no your GP ain't lying about how dangerous to the liver these pills can be. They work but you have to flood your system with the anti-fungal meds.
Posted by: sedge, February 21, 2011, 5:30pm; Reply: 8
Cor, they sound orrible!
Posted by: Lizzie53, February 21, 2011, 6:33pm; Reply: 9
I have this vile problem in both big toe nails. Saw a doc a few years ago who said the tablets were dangerous and to cover it up with nail polish! Anyway after seeing a podiatrist about other foot stuff he said ask the doc for Trosyl which you paint on. Its a clear liquid and easy enough to do. I keep it by the bed and do it morning and night. I have been using this twice daily for 3 months and have been told it will take at least a year of consistent use to cure it. I am pleased wth the progress so far and the nails look a lot better with the lower third of the nail looking clear of it. This trosyl has been prescribed for me and the chemist said this particular one cannot be bought over the counter. He said there is a similar one but would cost me 20 pounds a month. I will persist with this as it seems to be working and the chemist said that docs sometimes dont prescribe it because it does take a long time to work and many patients give up after a few months and then it is wasted money.
Posted by: AndyK, February 21, 2011, 6:58pm; Reply: 10
As Curanail just seems to hold the condition Trosyl seems worth a try. As it is perscription only and you can buy Curanail over the counter is suggests it is stronger. Whist my HbA1c, currently 8.2, could be better I do not think it is pertinent to the condition - if it was double digits maybe! I have also included "laser treatment" in the title as there has been no mention of it this afternoon.
Posted by: Idreamofchocolate, February 21, 2011, 7:21pm; Reply: 11
Has anyone else heard of this? http://www.nailfunguscure.co.uk/nail-fungus-home-remedies/vicks-vaporub-and-toenail-fungus.htm My daughter suffers from fungal nail infection in one toe, and has been prescribed some medication, which she won't take because she's breast feeding. I read about the Vicks cure a while ago, and she's not convinced, but is mulling it over. I am not sure what to think, but say it's worth trying. There are a lot of positive messages on forums about it, but some negative, and that's usually the way it is for most things.
Posted by: Pattidevans, February 21, 2011, 7:33pm; Reply: 12
Hi Andy and welcome to the forum.

I thought at one point that I had the fungus.   The Dr took nail clippings and sent them off because she said she didn't want to put me on the tablets until she was sure it was a fungus because she said the tablets could have bad side effects.  In the event, it wasn't the fungus, I had damaged both big toe nails by dropping something heavy on them.  

Out of curiosity I googled the laser treatment.  First of all I found this (nothing to do with laser - but looks interesting all the same!  http://www.tipking.co.uk/tip/5498.html )  Here http://www.articlesbase.com/medicine-articles/toenail-fungus-laser-effective-or-not-1656447.html is an article debating whether or not it works.  Somehow, looking at the prices those clinics advertising it are charging i.e. £750, I much doubt you'll get it on the NHS.
Quoted Text
Whist my HbA1c, currently 8.2, could be better I do not think it is pertinent to the condition - if it was double digits maybe!

You haven't said whether you are T1 or T2, but with an Hba1c of 8.2 it means that much of the time you are running BGs in the area of 11 - 12 which is really too high.  Indeed that level of BG would indeed encourage fungal infections and render them harder to cure.  A number of our members have found that once the BGs reduce they are no longer plagued with a variety of infections.  Please don't think I am being judgemental at all, because I'm not.  On the whole the medical profession in the UK do not make it easy for us to achieve better numbers.  In fact it never ceases to shock that they hand out such poor advice and then accuse patients of being uncompliant when their Hba1cs are not within their guidelines.  Surprisingly, a lot of us manage our condition better by talking to each other.

Ooops, I was typing whilst Maureen was posting.  I too have given a link to a site advocating using Vicks!
Posted by: Avocado, February 21, 2011, 7:36pm; Reply: 13
Hi Lizzie33,

I just told my husband about the Trosyl you mentioned and he's going to ask the doc for it. Since he's been using the over the counter stuff for four years I'm sure he can do another year on something hopefully more effective !

Thanks,
Posted by: Lizzie53, February 21, 2011, 7:43pm; Reply: 14
I hope it works for him but he must use it twice a day. If it is not used properly it will not work, I'm getting through about 1 bottle a month. I'm pleased so far. With regard to the nail clippings mine were sent off and came back as negative but the podiatrist said the tests were not reliable and clippimgs had to be cut out from low down on the nail not at the top. He was certain my problem was fungal. I don't suppose this makes any difference to your husband but you cannot use nail varnish while having this treatment so my toenails will be naked this summer.
Posted by: TessaH, February 21, 2011, 7:45pm; Reply: 15
I have a fungal toenail which I've been treating with prescribed Loceryl ( paint-on twice a week ) for well over a year and it hasn't worked. I took the oral ( systemic ) treatment for 3 months , about 6 -7 years ago ie long before diagnosis with diabetes , and believe me it's not nice to take ; I felt a bit sick most of the time. It worked in that I was clear for years. My current Dr says it's too toxic to be worth taking again , and I'm happy with that. Oddly enough I started putting Vick on it this very day. I'll report on how it works : I can't see any point in carrying on with the Loceryl. Haven't heard of laser treatment.
Posted by: Joanne G, February 21, 2011, 8:54pm; Reply: 16
Sorry Andy - I misread your post, and hadn't appreciated that you are diabetic, so what I said obviously doesn't apply here.

Jenny - I take your point. I should have said 'might have prevented' rather than 'very likely'. I still understand from what I've been reading that for some people, if they reduce their weight, and improve their diet, they can improve their IR, and if there isn't any/too much permanent damage done to their beta cells, that they may not progress to actually being diabetic. Anyway, as I said, I now realise that it's not relevant to this topic - will read the subtleties more carefully in future!
Posted by: sedge, February 21, 2011, 10:11pm; Reply: 17
I know Vicks is brilliant for mozzie bites - and in fact as a repellent - but do you want to spend your holidays smelling of it?  LOL  It's worth a try on the nails isn't it?
Posted by: Pattidevans, February 21, 2011, 10:54pm; Reply: 18
Quoted Text
I still understand from what I've been reading that for some people, if they reduce their weight, and improve their diet, they can improve their IR, and if there isn't any/too much permanent damage done to their beta cells, that they may not progress to actually being diabetic.
In actual fact, depending on the cause of the T2 diabetes, some people can actually reverse it.  I am none too sure of the mechanism and it does depend on exactly which bit of the endocrine system is broken, nor will it work for everyone....  but Sedge, remember Wallycorker?
Posted by: sedge, February 21, 2011, 11:05pm; Reply: 19
No comment to that last question ......
Posted by: Pattidevans, February 21, 2011, 11:20pm; Reply: 20
Hummm... OK
Posted by: wallycorker, April 14, 2011, 1:04am; Reply: 21
Quoted from Pattidevans
..........  but Sedge, remember Wallycorker?...........

Yes Patti - don't ever let the Type 2 diabetics forget Wallycorker!

You can read details of his reversal of Type 2 diabetes here hidden away in the bowels of this forum:

http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/forum/Blah.pl?m-1255112990/s-0/

..............and elsewhere on this and other diabetes forums before he became banned or unwelcome because he was doing OK!

Wallycorker is stilling doing fine!

What a crazy world we diabetics live in!

Best wishes to all - John

Posted by: sedge, April 14, 2011, 1:36am; Reply: 22
Where have you been banned from then, John?
Posted by: wallycorker, April 14, 2011, 2:12am; Reply: 23
Quoted from sedge
Where have you been banned from then, John?

Hi Sedge - It's good to hear from you!

As I remember things, I'm banned from the "Diabetes.co.uk" forum (I've been banned from that one twice) and the "Diabetes for Life" forum (I was very quickly banned from that one).

Also, I'm very unwelcome on the "DiabetesForum.com" and on this forum too.

I'm not very welcome by at least one of the moderators on the "Diabetes UK" forum either.

There may be other forums too without stretching my memory too far. Remembering things gets difficult these days at my age - or maybe quite simply because I'm starving my brain by not eating enough starchy carbohydrate!

In general, these days, I try to keep from being banned on forums by not posting on them very often.

Despite all that, seemingly, I'm still doing just fine by normal Type 2 standards - apart from regaining some weight that is!

Very best wishes as always - John

Posted by: Fergus, April 14, 2011, 7:56am; Reply: 24
Terbinafine Hydrochloride is the tablet my GP gave me. He does liver function tests to check that it aint ****ing that up ??)
Posted by: Venomous, April 14, 2011, 8:26am; Reply: 25
My daughter had a fungal toenail... doctor refused to give her anything at all for it, it disappeared in a few months, luckily, but I was mad at the time they wouldn't treat it!
Posted by: Lizzie53, April 14, 2011, 8:51am; Reply: 26
Quoted from wallycorker

Hi Sedge - It's good to hear from you!

As I remember things, I'm banned from the "Diabetes.co.uk" forum (I've been banned from that one twice) and the "Diabetes for Life" forum (I was very quickly banned from that one).

Also, I'm very unwelcome on the "DiabetesForum.com" and on this forum too.

I'm not very welcome by at least one of the moderators on the "Diabetes UK" forum either.

There may be other forums too without stretching my memory too far. Remembering things gets difficult these days at my age - or maybe quite simply because I'm starving my brain by not eating enough starchy carbohydrate!

In general, these days, I try to keep from being banned on forums by not posting on them very often.

Despite all that, seemingly, I'm still doing just fine by normal Type 2 standards - apart from regaining some weight that is!

Very best wishes as always - John



I suspect it doesn't take much to be banned from the diabetes uk forum. I've had 2 posts removed with no explanation. One of the mods there clearly diliked me. I don't bother to look in much nowadays. Much more support here.
Posted by: sedge, April 14, 2011, 5:35pm; Reply: 27
Quoted Text
Very best wishes as always - John



Same to you John - let's not go off topic though, this is the toenail thread!
Posted by: Winni, April 15, 2011, 1:02pm; Reply: 28
Ok-late to thread but I have lots of experience on this topic!

I have had a fungal infection on my left toe nails for over 5 years. I was prescribed the lamisil tablets and it cleared it up fast!  Problem was, I stopped taking them before the fungus had completely gone. It came back and new dr wasn't keen to presrcibe. In fact, most dr aren't keen to do anything especially with diabetes thrown into the mix.

I have used tysol (sp-sorry) without any joy. I finally got referred to a podiatrist after kicking off about it while pregnant. They said that it really isn't a big deal at all. Very common. Not related to my diabetes and would not lead to any damage. Only issue is cosmetic. I explainedthat was a BIG issue. She suggested I also paint over it in the summer. She said the beat treatment was curanail. You can get  a prescription for it. She explained the tablets were a big no no now. She also said in her opinion it was much better than the tysol. She said most people don't apply it properly. She then spent nearly 15 minutes filing my nails down with an electric file!  She said for the curanail to work, you must file down the nail really well before applying it.

I'm terrible at remembering to so it. But when I do give it a good run, the nails look loads better.

I'm entrigued about the vicks!  Will have a look ;-)  
Posted by: Pattidevans, April 15, 2011, 2:01pm; Reply: 29
Fergus
Quoted Text
Terbinafine Hydrochloride is the tablet my GP gave me.
The active ingredient in Lamisil, so presumably a generic version of it.
Posted by: Alan, April 16, 2011, 12:59am; Reply: 30
I don't have an answer, just a sort of a warning but also some good news.

Shortly after diagnosis in 2002 I developed a long-term infection on the right edge of my right big toe-nail where the nail dug into the skin slightly. Not really ingrown, but it needed constant trimming and occasionally flared and got infected, painful and with pus. I tried many things but eventually a topical antiseptic I bought in Spain on a trip in 2006 cured the infection. Sorry, I don't remember the name; something like "Topisol", a black thin liquid in a bright yellow bottle. Maybe Colette has seen it over there.

Well, it wasn't quite cured. A few months later a tiny spot on the nail in that region went white. No pain, no infection, but the white area spread for a couple of years until it was 1/4 of the nail area. Then I found that the nail was detached from the nail bed under that area. When I fully trimmed it I ended up with an L-shaped nail.

This all happened over several years. When I discussed it with the podiatrist he gave me the gloomy news that the nail bed was now dead in that area and would never support a nail again unless I had it debrided to start afresh. I decided I did not need that.

That was two years ago. For 18 months it seemed the podiatrist was correct, but I religiously trimmed the nail regularly and used good nail care over that time. Six months ago I noticed I needed to trim less. Last Tuesday I saw the podiatrist. He could not believe it. The nail has nearly covered the old dead area completely.

Sorry, I doubt this helps anyone here, just my own nail story.
Posted by: Pattidevans, April 16, 2011, 12:52pm; Reply: 31
Do you think the Topisol had anything to do with the nail detaching?
Posted by: Alan, April 18, 2011, 12:10am; Reply: 32
Quoted from Pattidevans
Do you think the Topisol had anything to do with the nail detaching?
No, both the podiatrist and I felt that the Topisol removed or at least mitigated the infection, but it was the original infection which had done the damage to the nail bed. We are not sure why it took so long to appear after that, but I've noticed over the years that nothing happens quickly with nails.

When I was moving furniture barefoot in 1999 on arriving at this address I stubbed my left big toe on a sofa and detached the nail completely. That took over two years to fully heal.
Posted by: colette, April 18, 2011, 9:41am; Reply: 33
I have never seen anything like that over here.  They do sell medicines over the counter but its certainly not like Boots where you can browse around and find what you want.  So unless you ask for a particular product its unlikely you would find it in the pharmacy.   That's a real pain for me over here.  I would really love to get something that would deal effectively with the awful catarrh (and still the bad taste in my mouth) but I can't be asked to even try to explain it to the pharmacist.  Just to walk around the chemist pick up a product, read the blurb and get it would be heaven.  Ah well I'm home in June for a month.
Posted by: lozzark, April 18, 2011, 2:12pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from Fergus
Terbinafine Hydrochloride is the tablet my GP gave me. He does liver function tests to check that it aint ****ing that up ??)

My doc said it was safe.  I took it for a suspected fungal infection.  It does have a potential shed load of side effects though

Posted by: Avocado, April 19, 2011, 9:46am; Reply: 35
Quoted from lozzark
My doc said it was safe.  I took it for a suspected fungal infection.  It does have a potential shed load of side effects though

My dh's chiropodist said she wasn't happy with my dh getting this medication as it has so many bad side effects and she had had several patients get serious liver problems with it. My dh is now scheduled to see a dermatology consultant about his fungal toenails as they've gone on for four years now and don't respond to any over the counter treatment or any chiropody treatment. Here's hoping the dermatologist comes up with something effective...other than Lamisil that is.

Posted by: Alan, April 19, 2011, 11:00am; Reply: 36
Quoted from colette
I have never seen anything like that over here.  They do sell medicines over the counter but its certainly not like Boots where you can browse around and find what you want.  So unless you ask for a particular product its unlikely you would find it in the pharmacy.   That's a real pain for me over here.  I would really love to get something that would deal effectively with the awful catarrh (and still the bad taste in my mouth) but I can't be asked to even try to explain it to the pharmacist.  Just to walk around the chemist pick up a product, read the blurb and get it would be heaven.  Ah well I'm home in June for a month.

I found my old bottle.

It's called Topionic. Here is the Spanish page. Translated it appears to be an antiseptic called povidione-iodine. It worked, but not well enough to prevent the later damage.

PS Not for toes or nails, but a month ago I developed a small area of fungal infection on the web between my middle and fourth finger on my right hand. The chemist recommended Hydrozole which contains "hydrocortisone (it belongs to the group of medicines called corticosteroids) and clotrimazole (it belongs to a group of medicines called antifungals)." I've not noticed any BG effects from the tiny amount of corticosteroids I rub on.

It has worked pretty well stopping the inflammation and spread but isn't getting rid of the final vestiges which are hanging around annoyingly.
Posted by: lozzark, April 19, 2011, 11:05am; Reply: 37
Quoted from Avocado

My dh's chiropodist said she wasn't happy with my dh getting this medication as it has so many bad side effects and she had had several patients get serious liver problems with it. My dh is now scheduled to see a dermatology consultant about his fungal toenails as they've gone on for four years now and don't respond to any over the counter treatment or any chiropody treatment. Here's hoping the dermatologist comes up with something effective...other than Lamisil that is.



You could try herbal remedies, but you do have to be patient and persistent.
I have also found calendula to be fairly powerful.  You can buy that as a cream in the high street, but a tincture is likely to be more effective.

I've also used manuka honey topically, but it did not seem to do anything.

Posted by: Ziggy, April 19, 2011, 11:50am; Reply: 38
Quoted from lozzark


I've also used manuka honey topically, but it did not seem to do anything.



I've used manuka honey cream topically and it worked as well if not better than Dermovate cream. What are you thoughts on the properties of olive leaf extract Lozzark?

ø¤º 8)º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º 8)º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º Z i g g y º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º 8)º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ º8)º¤ø


Posted by: Liam, April 19, 2011, 2:33pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Alan

I found my old bottle.

It's called Topionic. Here is the Spanish page. Translated it appears to be an antiseptic called povidione-iodine. It worked, but not well enough to prevent the later damage.

PS Not for toes or nails, but a month ago I developed a small area of fungal infection on the web between my middle and fourth finger on my right hand. The chemist recommended Hydrozole which contains "hydrocortisone (it belongs to the group of medicines called corticosteroids) and clotrimazole (it belongs to a group of medicines called antifungals)." I've not noticed any BG effects from the tiny amount of corticosteroids I rub on.

It has worked pretty well stopping the inflammation and spread but isn't getting rid of the final vestiges which are hanging around annoyingly.


Does that make it like the Iodine they use to prevent infection in operations then? You can buy that in my chemists. Can you tell I sometimes get bored waiting for them to make up scripts and look for weird and wonderful things to read on bottles? It is behind the 'ask pharmacist' glass so couldn't get a good read.

Posted by: Pattidevans, April 19, 2011, 4:05pm; Reply: 40
Quoted Text
Can you tell I sometimes get bored waiting for them to make up scripts and look for weird and wonderful things to read on bottles?
This afternoon I found myself marvelling at the cost of pregnancy tests whilst waiting.... they're mega expensive.  Back in my day they were about £2.
Posted by: nytquill17, April 19, 2011, 4:17pm; Reply: 41
Used to get distracted at work in the pharmacy, "ooh what is this bottle for? I've never heard of it!"  and reading ingredients and all kinds of things when I was supposed to be stocking the shelves.  There's all sorts of unusual unheard-of remedies you wouldn't know to look for unless you needed them! (and that's just in the OTC section, as just a clerk of course I couldn't poke around behind the lab counter, but they had lots of interesting stuff back there that I got glimpses of)

I always noticed that anything pain-related was always mega expensive.  E.g. supplements and pain relievers marketed to arthritis sufferers, for being common little pills the prices were astronomical!  You even pay more just for the "easy open" bottles for arthritic hands...of course the pharmacy doesn't have much choice in the prices they charge for medication, it's the companies.  And I always thought it was kind of underhanded to be charging more money to people who are desperate for some relief.
Posted by: Alan, April 20, 2011, 12:16am; Reply: 42
Quoted from Ziggy
I've used manuka honey cream topically and it worked as well if not better than Dermovate cream. What are you thoughts on the properties of olive leaf extract Lozzark?

ø¤º 8)º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º 8)º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º Z i g g y º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º 8)º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤ º8)º¤ø

I was using manuka honey when I developed the dangerous enlarging infection on my leg in 2008. Unfortunately it seemed to have no affect at all, positive or negative.

I eventually had to see the Hong Kong doctor, have the wound thoroughly cleaned out and go on a course of antibiotics and dressing changes for about a month.
Posted by: lozzark, April 20, 2011, 1:01am; Reply: 43
Quoted from Ziggy

What are you thoughts on the properties of olive leaf extract Lozzark?


I can't say I've used it myself, but it has good press

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