dsf logo September 2, 2014, 10:04am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

Diabetes Support Forum UK    Diabetes topics: closed to new messages. Visit the new forum (link above)    General Discussion  ›  HBAIC
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 5 Guests

HBAIC Print
2 Pages 1 2 » All Recommend Thread
Mike
January 4, 2011, 7:09pm Report to Moderator
Member
Posts: 5
Having been on Byetta (5mcg) since August I have just (late December) had my latest 3 monthly HBA1c Blood test which came out as 6.3%. At the end of September 2010 it was 7.2%.

Whilst this appears to be within the so called 'normal' range, I would appreciate some elaboration on what this all means. I'm assuming its good news?

Thank you.

Mike  
Logged Offline
Private Message
Venomous
January 4, 2011, 7:36pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 3,048
From what I've been reading, it means you'll live longer, and are less likely to develop any complications associated with diabetes.


Congrats!


PCOS and T2 DX Dec 2010. BP 160/90, Hba1c 9.9

Jan 11  Hba1c 9.5, Chol 4.4, trigs 1.3.

Mar 11  Hba1c 7.4, Chol 3.8

July 11  new Hba1c 7.1

Metformin SR 500gx4, Pioglitazone 30mg, Victoza 1.2 Avorastatin 40mg, Lisinopril 5mg, Sitagliptin 100mg
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 1 - 21
lib
January 4, 2011, 7:50pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 2,396
It means that your hba1c is lower than the research levels where they have indicated less complications are likely. Non diabetics sit around 4 or 5% hence the diabetic fixation with getting lower hba1c's

You are to be congratulated on your hard work

Well done


Type 1
Diagnosed 12th September 2008 Oct 08 .
First Hba1c 7.9%   Last Hba1c 5.7%

On Levemir and Novorapid

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 2 - 21
Pattidevans
January 4, 2011, 8:04pm Report to Moderator

It's ONLY diabetes. There are many worse things
Administrator Group
Posts: 23,578
Hi Mike

Congratulations on getting that Hba1c down to "nearly normal" levels (the HCPs tend to call it "normal" but you wouldn't get a non diabetic with that level, it's excellent for someone with diabetes though).  It's hard work and all down to your own efforts.  Carry on like that and you'll be in the 5% club next!  


Patti

Type 1 on Levemir/Humalog, Lisinopril, Thyroxine, Liothyronine and now 1000mg Glucophage SR. Last Hba1c 5.6  Highest Hba1c since March 2004.
Please visit our new forum http://diabetes-support.org.uk/diabetesforum/index.php as this one has closed
© 2011 Patti Evans
Logged
Site Private Message Reply: 3 - 21
libra201055
January 4, 2011, 8:30pm Report to Moderator

I control my Diabetes it does not control me
Moderator Group
Posts: 3,296
Well done Mike


Jenny

Dx Type 2 in October 2004

Meds currently - 2 x 500mg Metformin SR, Ramipril (10mg), Fluoxetine (20mg)

HbA1c - At Dx 12.3; '05 - 7.1; '06 - 8.1; '07 - 7.1 & 7.3; Feb'08 - 10.3; July '08 - 7.7; Feb '09 - 5.8: Aug '09 - 5.6: Sept '10 - 5.7: Sept '11 - 5.9  

Join us in the new DSF forum here - http://79.170.42.2/diabetes-support.org.uk/diabetesforum/index.php
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 4 - 21
FordPrefect
January 4, 2011, 10:11pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 480
Mike, docs want everyone under 6.5% as its the point where the incidence of problems drops off a lot, but obviously better go down to the sorts of numbers a non diabetic would get which is between 5 and 5.5%. Anything under 6.5% is great tho and if you can tinker it down even further that's great but it really is a case of diminishing returns. I'm suprised they havent upped you to the 10mcg dose as thats the normal dose, although when I was on byetta I never went upto the 10mcg dose as the 5mcg dose was hugely effective a little too much so. Its unusual to only be on byetta however as NICE guidelines and the drugs license is that it should be taken with either a sulf such as gliclazide, metformin or more recently pioglitazone(actos) unless those stipulations have been dropped over the past year with little press. Obviously this is in UK and not sure where you are


Type 2 Diagnosed March 2008 - Max Metformin s/r, Max Vildagliprin, max gliclazide. Also dyslexic so please dont pull apart my spelling or grammar I do my best Email/MSN : mark@koszler.net, skype : fordprefectu, googletalk : fordprefect0, Website : http://koszler.net
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Windows Live Messenger Skype Reply: 5 - 21
TerryG
January 5, 2011, 1:47am Report to Moderator

Moderator Group
Posts: 3,557
Not wishing to gainsay Ford - and all he says about levels I agree with - but my own experience is that quite a number of GPs are now telling their patients NOT to go below 6.5. I mention this so you may be forearmed - including with the explanation.

A recent piece of research headlined the 'fact' that mortality rises at levels below 6.5. For many doctors that seems now to be set in stone.

The brief truth about that research is that it was done over a 20 year period (so included the treatments of 20 years ago) with elderly men who, as a last retort and presumably because nothing else was available to control their decline and complications, were moved on to insulin (often mixed) to try to get their numbers (often high for years) down. You may begin to see why mortality in this group was higher. And indeed the report authors included caveats about the nature of the research. But of course that doesn't fit into the 200-word news item the doctor reads.

So make your own mind up if faced with such a statement by a medic. As far as I know the research shows that risk of complications continues to fall as HbA1cs come down to non-diabetic levels (as long as it doesn't require "intensive therapy" to achieve this). As Ford rightly observes the improvement curve will flatten out toward the lower end, so how it's a matter of balancing the effort against the marginal benefits below, say, 6.5%.


T1 DX 06/2003 ex-Lantus/Novo, now using Medtronic Paradigm Veo with Apidra. Dafne graduate.
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 6 - 21
Alan
January 5, 2011, 3:56am Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 2,739
Quoted from Mike
Having been on Byetta (5mcg) since August I have just (late December) had my latest 3 monthly HBA1c Blood test which came out as 6.3%. At the end of September 2010 it was 7.2%.

Whilst this appears to be within the so called 'normal' range, I would appreciate some elaboration on what this all means. I'm assuming its good news?

Thank you.

Mike  
It's excellent news. Heading in the right direction


Cheers, Alan, T2 dx April 2002, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com (Free Radicals and James Bond)
http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (Kochi, Kerala, India)
Logged Offline
Private Message Skype Reply: 7 - 21
FordPrefect
January 5, 2011, 12:38pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 480
Quoted from TerryG
Not wishing to gainsay Ford - and all he says about levels I agree with - but my own experience is that quite a number of GPs are now telling their patients NOT to go below 6.5. I mention this so you may be forearmed - including with the explanation.

A recent piece of research headlined the 'fact' that mortality rises at levels below 6.5. For many doctors that seems now to be set in stone.

The brief truth about that research is that it was done over a 20 year period (so included the treatments of 20 years ago) with elderly men who, as a last retort and presumably because nothing else was available to control their decline and complications, were moved on to insulin (often mixed) to try to get their numbers (often high for years) down. You may begin to see why mortality in this group was higher. And indeed the report authors included caveats about the nature of the research. But of course that doesn't fit into the 200-word news item the doctor reads.

So make your own mind up if faced with such a statement by a medic. As far as I know the research shows that risk of complications continues to fall as HbA1cs come down to non-diabetic levels (as long as it doesn't require "intensive therapy" to achieve this). As Ford rightly observes the improvement curve will flatten out toward the lower end, so how it's a matter of balancing the effort against the marginal benefits below, say, 6.5%.


Terry raises a good point I forgot about that "research" as it was so badly done and was widely ripped apart by doctors and the medical profession too. All I can say is the endo's I have seen have all wanted me to be definetly below 6.5 but preferably in the 5% club and were really happy when I was 5.7 and 5.9


Type 2 Diagnosed March 2008 - Max Metformin s/r, Max Vildagliprin, max gliclazide. Also dyslexic so please dont pull apart my spelling or grammar I do my best Email/MSN : mark@koszler.net, skype : fordprefectu, googletalk : fordprefect0, Website : http://koszler.net
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Windows Live Messenger Skype Reply: 8 - 21
BATcher
January 5, 2011, 4:55pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 549
The argument against having blood sugar levels (and hence the long-term HbA1c figure) too low is that the lower the value then the more danger you will be in of having hypos.

Since this is somewhat dependent on the individual, then the sensible aim (IMNVHO) is to reduce your BG/HbA1c levels to such a point that you have only the very occasional hypo.

As with most things, it is easier said than done!


BATcher

Type 2, diagnosed June 1993, on insulin since May 2005; last HbA1c 5.9% (gosh!);
early morning: Levemir, 29 u;
at each main meal: NovoRapid, ~10-20 u, with Metformin, 1 g;
just before bedtime: Levemir, 37 u; also simvastatin and aspirin;
Byetta worked very well for three weeks - then stopped working.  Sob.
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 9 - 21
everydayupsanddowns
January 5, 2011, 7:16pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 519
Quoted from BATcher
Since this is somewhat dependent on the individual, then the sensible aim (IMNVHO) is to reduce your BG/HbA1c levels to such a point that you have only the very occasional hypo.


'Very occasional'... is that like 'no more than 2 a day' Batch?


Mike

Type 1 since: 1991 Last HBA1c: 6.3.  Lipids: 4.7 Chol (calculated 2.1HDL/2.3LDL) Trigs 0.7
Currently on: Humalog (via Humapen Memoir) and Lantus (via Autopen 24)
Blogging at: www.everydayupsanddowns.co.uk

PLEASE NOTE: This is the archive version of this forum and no longer accepts new posts/replies. The new forum is open here: www.diabetes-support.org.uk/diabetesforum/
Logged Offline
Site Private Message Reply: 10 - 21
Liam
January 5, 2011, 8:30pm Report to Moderator
Member
Posts: 678
My team means 1 or less a week by 'very occasional' and them not requiring help.     I think that is pretty dam hard really, but maybe it can be done?     I'm not quite there myself yet.


DX Type I 1994.    
Levemir  22u AM / 10u PM      
Novorapid; Breakfast 2:1, Lunch 1:1, Evening meal 1.5:1

HbA1c 3/10 10.2%, 7/10 8.1%, 12/10 7.5%, 2/11 7.8%, 8/11 8.6% 9/11 8.3%
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 11 - 21
Pattidevans
January 5, 2011, 8:45pm Report to Moderator

It's ONLY diabetes. There are many worse things
Administrator Group
Posts: 23,578
Not had one at all this week.  Just had the opposite all week   I actually don't mind them a couple of times a week and have good enough warnings to catch them in the low 3s.


Patti

Type 1 on Levemir/Humalog, Lisinopril, Thyroxine, Liothyronine and now 1000mg Glucophage SR. Last Hba1c 5.6  Highest Hba1c since March 2004.
Please visit our new forum http://diabetes-support.org.uk/diabetesforum/index.php as this one has closed
© 2011 Patti Evans
Logged
Site Private Message Reply: 12 - 21
lib
January 6, 2011, 1:52pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 2,396
I per week?!

PMSL!!

Spot the non diabetics!!

Seriously though, Ive only had two in the last 5 or 6 days, its usually human error with this week particularly being bad as to evening munchies and stacking insulin....


Type 1
Diagnosed 12th September 2008 Oct 08 .
First Hba1c 7.9%   Last Hba1c 5.7%

On Levemir and Novorapid

Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 13 - 21
BATcher
January 6, 2011, 5:20pm Report to Moderator

Member
Posts: 549
'Very occasional'... is that like 'no more than 2 a day' Batch?
I was thinking of the order of about one a month, but, hey, YHMV!  (Your Hypos May Vary)



BATcher

Type 2, diagnosed June 1993, on insulin since May 2005; last HbA1c 5.9% (gosh!);
early morning: Levemir, 29 u;
at each main meal: NovoRapid, ~10-20 u, with Metformin, 1 g;
just before bedtime: Levemir, 37 u; also simvastatin and aspirin;
Byetta worked very well for three weeks - then stopped working.  Sob.
Logged Offline
Private Message Reply: 14 - 21
2 Pages 1 2 » All Recommend Thread
Print



COPYRIGHT ©2008-2010: All messages on this site are copyright of their authors. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without express written permission.

Powered by E-Blah Forum Software 10.3.6 © 2001-2008

Valid XHTML Valid CSS Sourceforge.net Powered by Perl